Art

Culture

Artist Residency

Our multi-disciplinary artist residency program introduces the possibility for creative collaboration between international artists and Sumba artisans.

We invite contemporary artists and designers to Cap Karoso to share their creative universe with local artisans while learning the ancestral traditions. In this cross-sharing of knowledge and inspiration, a new cultural dialogue is born.

Featured artwork

Across Cap Karoso – from the lounge to the beach club, to your studio or villa – the universal language of Art creates a meaningful connection with the ancestral culture of Sumba.  Explore artistic reflections on Marapu culture through commissioned artwork by Indonesian and international artists.

Artists
  • Alexander Sebastianus Hartanto (b. 1995) sees ethnographic research as an experiential mode of existence. His works explore the decontextualization of material cultures and how they are perceived, understood, and ritualized in practice. For Sebastianus, decolonizing the ontologies of art is to reclaim Sani, a way of living that involves offering, service, and search of the unknown. Such a practice leads to a recreation of pilgrimages, sacred spaces, and woven cloths, all of which may or may not be archived, documented, or shared. In Sani, what is left are remnants and evidence of materials.

    A. Sebastianus Hartanto is an artist who achieved the William Daley Award for Excellence in Art History and Craft in 2017. Trained as an apprentice in his grandmother's hometown in East Java, he mastered the art of weaving, which has become essential in his exploration of visual and material ontology.

  • Clarissa Nilistiani (b.1996, Jakarta, Indonesia) is a textile artist working in the medium of knitting, weaving, and painting. Clarissa graduated from Nottingham Trent University with a Bachelor of Textile Design, receiving an Honors Degree in 2019.

    Clarissa’s practice explores the conversation of traditional textiles' importance in the midst of Indonesia’s modern progression, engaging with unconventional materials that are oftentimes raw and unprocessed, and crafted techniques which emphasise on hand values. Her textile works focus on creating organic texture using raffia, banana, pineapple, recycled fibers, and other unrecognised natural fibers. Exploration which challenges newness and shifting perspective on the use of Indonesian nature and promotes rural economy. Her paintings revolve to accompany the textile pieces in purpose to capture the narratives much further.

  • Ines Katamso (b.1990), born in Yogyakarta is an artist of of mixed nationalities. Her father, an Indonesian musician, her mother, a French tattoo artist. Ines spent the first ten years of her life in Yogyakarta, before moving to France where she received her education in art and design. Shortly after graduation Ines then returned to her homeland in order to develop her ever-expanding creative practice first as a muralist followed by the creation of her own surface design studio, Atelier Seni.

    Ines's past works, consisting of geometric shapes, lines, and organic forms, while at first glance whimsical, express a much deeper internal process of self-reflection and discovery. Her recent work dives deep into research into microbiology and the study of forms. Growing bacteria in her own studio, Katamso has studied the details and movement of cells and how life itself is wholly interconnected.

  • Yuki Nakayama is an artist born and raised in Okinawa, Japan. In 2008, she decided to move to New York to pursue her passion for the arts. Graduated from Parsons the New School for Design, she studied interior design where she began exploring spaces of play in the domestic and public environment. As her interest grew to larger scales, she graduated from The Cooper Union, where she studied architecture. Before coming back to Okinawa, she lived in New York for over ten years.

    Fascinated by playground architecture, her work is influenced and motivated by its history and urgency. She believes that play is the foundation of being; from the moment you are born, it is our inherited tool for survival. Moving between tangible three-dimensional spaces and two-dimensional drawings, her interest lays in the spaces that are perhaps lost in translation. Painting came naturally as a medium that bridges the difference. Visualizing new spaces within the gaps of architectural representation, her work focuses on the intimacy of play. Gestures of spaces are painted in bold, while the lines carve out details that invite multiple perspectives to viewers. The speckles of colors inhabit these spaces as they highlight each territory. She intends to continue to use painting as a tool to explore the built environment.